Netflix Review: Tiger King

Just completed the 7 episodes of the Netflix documentary: Tiger King. This is one of the most horror real life series watched ever. I mean seriously, with every episode ending, it gave a new shock and twist to the story. This series had been released last year, and it had been on my To Watch list for quite a while. But somehow, I used to just watch the first few minutes of episode 1, and stop the documentary. But then, I decided to enter his Tiger kingdom, and know what makes this guy famous!

Having completed watching this series, I can say that I am actually horrified the way they ended this series. I mean this is real life story. So, the things shown in the documentary are for REAL, and not like the fake real in reality shows. People’s lives have been at stake, including the Tiger King – Joe. I find that this documentary has everything to offer. Rather, I can put it this way. Is there anything not there in this documentary? Because, it has horror, suspense, comedy, music, murder, hero, villain, fights, politics, business etc etc. This even surpasses the typical bollywood movies which are often infamous for making a masala movie with all sorts of fights and romances.

I wont go into the story. Neither I want to discuss who is guilty or who is not. Because, for me, they all seem to be guilty. Joe, who is known as Tiger King, is currently in jail for killing tigers and attempting to hire for murder of Carol. The documentary shows the ever-lasting feud between Joe and Carol. And as if their feud which included all possible methods of revenge or harrassment was less, the documentary shows several other characters in and around them, which play important role to their life. I would say do watch this documentary, with ofcourse certain discretion as its not a very family friendly documentary. Many scenes are horrific, beyond reason or even common sense. Before writing this review, I got depressed after watching this documentary end ( though it was kind of expected). So, PLEASE WATCH WITH CAUTION.

One of the most terrifying part of this documentary is the evil side of human nature being displayed by almost everyone, maybe with one or two exceptions. I wont take any names, as they all are real life people, like you and me. But I found most of them having vicious nature. Many of them had felony charges, so its not surprising. But the way feud was aggravated, with not only throwing mud at each other, but also getting to the point to threaten to kill each other. I mean this is disgraceful. I even felt many time if I was watching Godfather, or Irishman or even a cold war era spy movie. Because such types of movies show such heinous scenes of crime and injustice. But looking at the lives of real people in this documentary , I find no difference between those movies and this one.

The worst part is how American culture is obsessed with money and fame. I am not saying all Americans act in similar way. No they don’t. Because I have stayed in the USA for 5 years, and know enough Americans, to know the difference. But the point is that this culture of intense competition and feud is a part of American culture. And making money plays a big role in it. History tells us be it Coke vs Pepsi, Microsoft vs Apple, Google vs Yahoo, Amazon vs eBay, Ford vs GM, CNN vs Fox News etc etc, we can find so much cut-throat competition amongst companies to dominate the market, and thereby get rich. I find similar feuds shown in this documentary between the companies which want to dominate the live show market of exotic wild animals such as tigers, lions, ligers etc. The only difference between other so called reputed companies, and the ones shown in this documentary is the way they handle the feud. The mainstream companies settle their disputes amicably, with out of court settlement, or even lobbying pressure. While the ones shown in this documentary cross the limits of human civilization and decency. Else,there is no difference. The America culture has always encouraged this competition under the disguise of capitalism and free market, but in reality, the beneficiary are only a few high position occupying people in these companies.

As the title of the documentary says Murder, Madness & Mayhem, it actually perfectly suits it. Because even though the documentary shows wild animals which are caged or even bred for the sake of entertainment, but it hardly throws any light on what can be done to solve this problem, and thereby make the life of these wild animals safer and healthy. Rather, all this documentary shows is the feud between companies, their people, the insights into their life, their music compositions, their legal disputes etc. Even though it does cover the indictment of Joe, and finally ends when he goes to jail, but I am left with the question of what would happen to those 200+ wild animals kept in his zoo? Will they be simply transfered to another zoo owned by another person? I mean finally, those animals are the real sufferers, behind the cage, isn’t it? Don’t they deserve to be lived freely in the wild forest? And the irony is the documentary shows the woman fighting for this cause, but she herself has kept the wild animals in the cage, and charges people to view them with the help of volunteers, who are not paid? Is there any better business model than this one?

Another thing which struck my cultural aspect is the portrayal of the person who has a Hindu name. He shows to be a follower of a Guru, who had been to the Woodstock festival. He claimed to be eating veg food, and living the life as his Guru wanted. But this is all wrong and misleading. Because on one side, he claims to be living a ascetic life, but on the other side, he has several partners ( beautiful white christian women given hindu first names) with whom he has sexual encounter with. I hate to write this, but this is kind of an insult to Hinduism ( which happens to be my religion, but I would certainly feel the same way for all religions if they had been portrayed in such a negative way). I think that man has not understood Hinduism, or for the matter any religion. Because, all religions convey the message of peace, love and happiness. Using a particular religion by just using its names, or pretending to follow a certain teacher, is not following the religion. I find this to be a problem with few white Americans. They had been a part of hippie commune during 1960’s and 70’s, and even though the hippie movement subsided, these few people continued to exploit the local Americans by showing them to be following an alien religion ( like Hinduism or Buddhism), under the disguise of yoga, meditation, philosophy, enlightenment etc. This is all WRONG. They have completely misunderstood that religion. Infact, all they are doing is just gathering followers by being different, and filling their coffers with $$$. Thats it!

Thus, I end the review here. Its a one time watching documentary. It has very different story, something which is not seen very commonly in real life. For the real life depiction and excellent filming of the documentary, I would give a 3.5/5 rating. But I am not happy with the way things ended. I hope justice will be delivered to all of them. But then, I remind myself that after all its an American story….

Review: A Suitable Boy

I watched the Netflix series, ‘A Suitable Boy’ yesterday. This BBC directed series, having 6 episodes, is based on the Vikram Seth’s novel, with the same title. I have not read the book, and so I cannot comment on the originality and comparison between the book and the TV show. But I would like to express my opinion on the miniseries.

The story is based on a newly independent India from the clutches of British rule. Those were the years around 1950-52, when India embarked on its journey to build a nation which had been dominated by mass poverty, communal hatred between Hindus and Muslims, and an immediate need to strengthen the unity of India. The story revolves around four families in Brahmpur town, which are the Kapoors( key family in local politics), Mehras( in-laws of Kapoors), Khans ( who are the Nawabs) and Chatterjis( rich, liberal family in Calcutta). along with Saeeda bai (the singer-prostitute), Kabir Durrani and Haresh Khanna.

Lata, is the protagonist of the story, whose mother wants to find a suitable boy for her to marry. Lata falls in love with Kabir Durrani, a handsome guy in Brahmpur university. But she finds out that he is a Muslim, and hence she decides not to marry him as her conservative family would never accept it. Her brother’s family is married to Chatterji’s in Calcutta, and her sister-in-law introduces Lata to Namit Chatterji, who belongs to a rich Bengali family, immersed deeply in literature and music. Lata finds Namit exceedingly liberal, poetic and dreamer, and she still goes out with him a few times. But later, she realizes that she would never be his dream woman, as she is too pragmatic and conservative. Even Lata’s mother did not like Namit.

Then, Lata’s mother introduces Lata to Haresh, who is a self-made man, working as a foreman in shoe factory. Haresh had ran away from his family, toiled hard to make his way up in the factory, and even went to England for higher studies. Lata’s mother likes Haresh and finds him to be suitable boy for Lata. Initially, Lata is not very appreciative of Haresh’s humble nature, and down to earth attitude. Finally, at the end, when Haresh after not receiving any positive response from Lata, he decides to move on, she does realize how much she loved him. So, she ran away to the railway station, and then proposed Haresh in front of everyone. Thus, Lata ( and her mother) are successful in finding ‘A Suitable Boy’ as per the storyline! End of the story.

This might sound to be a boring story, but this is the crux of the TV series. Yes, you read it right. Even though there are many other characters and supporting sub-stories to extend this to a 6 episode series, but the main storyline sticks to the suitable boy hunt for Lata. As I have not read the original book, hence, I am not sure how the book conveyed this story. But this BBC produced and Mira Nair directed miniseries lacks originality. It seems that the series has been hastingly concluded without even making the purpose of characters relevant. For example, Kabir’s role is very brief and non-relevant. Initially, it does seem that Lata has fallen for Kabir,and this might become another Hindu-Muslim romance story, but Lata simply rejects him ( even after performing in Shakespeare’s play along with him).

Maan Kapoor’s dalliance with Saeedabai and Meenakshi Chatterji’s sexual scenes with some random guy named Billy( while trying to hide this from Mehra’s and Kapoor’s) are utterly non-relevant for this story theme. It seems that being western directed, they want to insert some sex scenes just to make it look romantic and gather audience to watch this series. But such tactics work in Hollywood, but not in Indian diaspora. Indians often do not want sex scenes in the movie/TV series just for the sake of making it romantic. Rather, we Indians often appreciate the subtle emotions of love between the lovers, and few romantic songs. Due to the multiple western motivated coitus scenes, makes it even more banal.

However, the background of local village politics, which is often influenced by religion and caste equations is superbly portrayed in this series. The scenes of communal violence between Hindus and Muslims is something of a stigma on the Indian society. Yes, it is true that India have had many riots after independence, and both sides are to be blamed equally. I am in no denial of this. But the problem I find is the primary focus these so called western (BBC and Hollywood) directors and writers put on this topic, especially the British. They find solace in adding fuel to fire by showing the riots and hatred between these two religions, very often in their movies and TV series. I don’t understand why? Infact the irony is the British themselves played the divide and rule politics before India became independent, and led to the partition of India. And since then, they have been propagandizing to the world through such shows and movies, that how the two religions still fight and hate each other. BBC and western movie directors should realize that India has come up much ahead and has proudly stood as an example of ‘Unity in Diversity‘ amidst all its problems.

Infact, this is one of the biggest flaws in this story. They should have shown Lata marrying Kabir, defying the religious divide. This would have ideally been in congruence with the secular idea of India. If they can show a scene of Kabir kissing Lata in the temple premises ( which led to a huge controversy of ‘Love-Jihad’ in the India conservative media), why can’t they take it ahead of showing them being married? But as per the story, Lata marries Haresh, who is more of an arranged guy deemed suitable in the conservative Indian mindset. This is where the miniseries disappoints most of the audience, including me.

But the series does have some positive remarks as well. It courageously portrays the bond between Maan and Firoz, and Mahesh Kapoor and the Nawab, as a Hindu-Muslim unity,which does earn accolades from the viewers like me. The background of a 1950’s India in Calcutta, and villages is very excellently displayed. The elite clubs of Calcutta, the land reform bill and its effect on the zamindaars/landlords, the 1952 elections, and even the prejudice faced by hard working Indians ( as in case of Haresh Khanna while trying to secure a job in Praha, a Czech shoe factory for the managerial position) from the British/European firms in India are shown with intricacy. This gives the viewers a panorama of the early years of India after independence.

Concluding this review, I would give a rating of 3 out of 5. The series could have fared much better had they removed the sexual scenes, which were non-relevant for the story. But the series fares well in depicting the Indian mindset behind marrying women, the deep involvement of family in selecting the right guy for the girl, and the historic background shown in the post-independence India.

The Banal lives of Bollywood Wives

Recently, I watched the Netflix series ‘Fabulous lives of Bollywood Wives‘. After watching this show, I simply find no words to rate or assess this show. The show lacks complete originality and so I decided to name it as ‘banal’ instead of the so called given name ‘fabulous’.

To begin with the review, the show portrays the life of 4 bollywood families, which are the Kapoors ( there are many kapoors in bollywood, and the least famous is shown in this series), Khans, Pandey and Soni. The former two (Sanjay and Maheep Kapoor, Seema and Sohail Khan) are known to be a part of the bollywood elite, but I have no idea why Pandey ( Chunky and Bhavna) and Soni (Samir and Neelam) are a part of this show, even though they have acted in quite a few movies, but certainly they are not very famous.

The 8 episode series shows the life of four wives, Maheep, Seema, Bhavna and Neelam. I find all four of them obsessed with fake accents, speaking bad words including the F*** word, self obsession over looks, boasting of wealth, and desperate attempt to launch their kids in this industry. All four of them are seen to be demanding, money and fame driven, unrespectful of each other or even the common people. Their abroad trips to Paris or Doha, performing facelift for anti-aging, petty fights, drinking, clandestine attempt to seduce other men is not at all fabulous. All this does not make them fabulous or respected either. Hence, I was disappointed to see the pitiful life of bollywood wives shown in this series. I find this series to be a waste of time and utterly banal.

But, at the same time, after watching this series, we also understand what bollywood is in reality. Most Indians, and even abroad watch bollywood movies, and many of us are die hard fans of the actors and actresses. Starting from the golden age of bollywood in 1950’s and 60’s ( with Raj Kapoor, Dev Anand and Dilip Kumar), to the angry young man era of Amitabh Bachchan in 1970’s and 80’s, from the romantic 90’s ( with Shahrukh, Salman and Amir Khan) to the modern age cinema of 2000’s and 2010’s, bollywood has always been the defacto entertainment for the Indian audience ( apart from Cricket). We all love and follow the way these superstars act, talk, walk, dance and sing. We even emulate their way of life and dream to become rich and famous like them.

But the reality shown in the movies, is not always the reality of life. Even though I have tremendous respect for bollywood stars like Amitabh, Shahrukh, Amir and many more ( especially the golden age era or even the parallel cinema of 1970’s and 80’s). But still bollywood life has always been mired with obsession for looks, wealth, fame, cut throat competition and jealousy. The actors and actresses are never happy in their life. The uncertainity of career and fear of being surpassed by talented new comers is always there. They often resort to drinking, smoking, recreational drugs, extra marital affairs to get rid of excess stress and fear of losing the fame. Ofcourse, not everyone does this, but bollywood is certainly not a very comforting or accomodating place.

Even worse than these vices, is the nepotism. Just like politics in India, bollywood is stained with nepotism. Everyone knows that nepotism runs in the blood of bollywood. If we look at the top families of bollywood, be it Kapoors, Khans, Bachchans, Bhatt’s, Deol’s, Chopra’s or Mukherjee-Samarth family, all have been in this industry for decades, generations after generations. Even though, nepotism does not demote their acting skills, as I agree as most Indians would, that these families inspite of their nepotism have been skilled and very professional in the show business. Along with their good photogenic looks, they carry the sophistication of being a brand and have glorified the Indian cinema for years at the global stage with their sheer hard work and dedication.

The famous Kapoor family and family tree
Bachchan family
Anil Kapoor family and tree
Salman Khan family and tree

But still the biggest disadvantage of neoptism is unleveling of the ground for new comers. The kids of famous bollywood families get the leverage and attention to rise up fairly easy, and this makes the life of newcomers difficult who inspite of their talent, may not always succeed in bollywood.

Even though there are exceptions like Shah Rukh Khan, Jackie Shroff, Ayushmann Khurana, Madhuri Dixit, Kanagana Ranaut, Sushant Singh Rajput etc. Many of the outsiders have succeeded, even though less than the number who fail or get thrown away due to nepotism. The case of Sushant Singh Rajput’s suicide is the most famous example of the struggle and hardships an outsider has to endure to earn a name in this unforgiving industry. But finally, beyond nepotism, it is said that ‘work begets work’ and this has been even agreed upon by Sanjay Kapoor in this Netflix series, that finally work brings more work.

I think this is the only good part of this series, that finally, the bollywood is coming to an understanding that its not nepotism or connections but work brings more work, fame and recognition. That’s why Shah Rukh Khan (SRK), an outsider became the ‘King Khan of Bollywood’, while Abhishek Bachchan, who is the son of ‘Big B’ Amitabh Bachchan ( an outsider himself) could not earn that reputation like his father earned.

Finally, in the series, I find the most disgusting part is the shallow, fake and banal lives of the bollywood wives shown by the king of nepotism Karan Johar . Actually, they are not even part of bollywood who are successful. They are just missing that success and fame, which SRK, or Big B families have garnered. That’s why they are jealous of others, and desperate to launch their kids to earn that fame and wealth, which they could not earn. So, its worth noting that the life shown in this series is not always the typical bollywood wives life.

Infact, there are many actually talented, real bollywood wives like Kajol ( wife of Ajay Devgn, who stays away from bollywood limelight), Madhuri Dixit( married to a surgeon), Shabana Azmi ( wife of famed poet and lyricist Javed Akhtar), Hema Malini ( wife of Dharmendra), Jaya Bachchan ( wife of Amitabh Bachchan), Ratna Pathak Shah( wife of Naseeruddin Shah), Zeenat Aman, Gracy Singh and many more. They are the real gems and queens of bollywood. These wives/actresses do not behave or live a so called ‘fabulous’ life as shown in the Karan Johar ‘KJo’ produced netflix series. They often live a simple life, away from limelight after their acting career is over. Many of them are excellent housewives, and even some of them are in politics or social service. They are the real bollywood wives, and not the four wives shown in the series.

Thus, I end this review with the understanding that even though there are some fringe elements in bollywood as shown in this netflix series,& even though there is nepotism, family dynasties, cut throat competition, jealousy breeding grounds etc, but at the end, its always the work and talent which stays forever at the end.

Cuba and the Cameraman

How one American journalist visited Cuba for over 40 years, and showed the world the other side of Cuba.

REVIEW] Netflix's captivating documentary, Cuba and the Cameraman
source

Recently I watched a documentary movie named ‘Cuba and the Cameraman’ filmed, written and co-produced by an American journalist Jon Alpert. The film can be watched on Netflix.

I really enjoyed watching the documentary. It shows both the positives and negatives of life in Cuba, and how Cuba transformed through its revolution in 1959 led by Fidel Castro till the death of Fidel Castro in 2016. The movie depicts the lives of common people in Cuba, especially the three farmer brothers, Cristobal, Angel and Gregario. Many people were filmed and asked questions about their life in Cuba. The people came from all spectrums of life. They included farmers like the three Borrego brothers, shopkeepers, factory workers, construction laborers, doctors, teachers and students.

Jon even went ahead to interview the most famous man in Cuba, which is none other than Fidel Castro himself. He shows how he managed to interview him multiple times, inspite of being an American. He was the only journalist who was allowed to accompany Fidel during his visit to New York for the United Nations speech which Fidel was scheduled to give. The movie shows the lighter and humorous side of Fidel, who enjoyed smoking famous Cuban cigars, and happily answered all the questions asked by Jon.

Cuba and the Cameramen
Jon interviewing Fidel

The most interesting part of the documentary is its informal interaction with the Cubans. Unlike other documentaries, which usually has some underlying message or theme for a particular cause, I find this movie to be purely an interaction of an American with the Cubans. It has no political intentions, neither does it try to relate the adversity of Cuba to socialism or advocating America’s capitalism. The movie shows Jon visiting the same people for almost 40 years. It starts from the mid 1970’s till 2016. During this time, Cuba underwent a number of transformations, including being a successful socialist country in mid 1970’s ( though heavily subsidized by Soviet Union) to a struggling economy in early 1990’s when Soviet Union fell apart and Cuba got severely affected, which led to mass shortage of goods. Then the movie shows again the revival of good times for Cuba in the late 2000’s and 2010’s decade, when Cuba started attracting tourists from all over the world to revitalize its economy.

The best part I liked in the movie is when Jon interacts with the Borrego brothers. I simply love the way those three brothers lived their life. They were simple, poor farmers, who toiled hard throughout the day, yet never complained of the troubles, or hardships they faced. They did not have any tractors, or electricity yet managed to carry on their work diligently. Things changed in Cuba to a large extent, but the life of these three brothers did not change much. They never complained even when things got worse in Cuba. They truely believed in the socialist idea, and hence volunteered for the country without any pay or perks. When Jon asked, “What’s the secret to your happiness, Cristobal?” He replied, “We’re always working and walking, exercising. That’s the secret to being healthy and strong”.When Jon met them, the brothers were very old. Yet Cristobal who was 80 years old could beat in an arm wrestle against Jon, who was 40 years old at that time!

Jon Alpert Talks 'Cuba and the Cameraman': "In terms of romantic heroism,  Fidel and his story are pretty astonishing!" | HuffPost

Jon Alpert with the Borrego brothers Huff Post

What I learnt from this documentary and Cubans, is that life is not easy at all. but also life is always changing. Good and bad times are a part of life. As taught to me in the Art of Living course, Opposite values are complementary to each other. Cubans saw some of the worst days in the 1990’s but today, we see they are a booming economy. Even though the economy busted or boomed, leaders like Fidel came and went, but what never changed for people like Borrego brothers is the happiness, or satisfaction about life. They never got depressed or even commit suicide, but they faced the adversity with a smile on their face. Afterall, this is what life is all about!

And finally, I appreciate Jon’s tireless efforts to travel to Cuba for over 40 years, and keep track of the people he met to understand about their life and their problems. I liked his generosity to give an electrolarynx to Cristobal who had lost his voice later. I wish I could make an impact on someone’s life. After all, life is all about caring for others, to build relationships, and this movie indeed has a touch of humanity, benevolence and simplicity. 

Digital Frankensteins!

Today, I watched the Netflix documentary “The Social Dilemma”. Its a terrific and also quite alarming documentary. It reminds us as Tristan Harris said, “The social media are becoming ‘Digital Frankensteins!’, steering billions of people‚Äôs attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors”.

It is quite true. We see the young generation not only prone to the venomous effects of social media, but also becoming more and more separated from reality. They are becoming slowly a part of virtual reality, in which whatever is seen, heard or read on social media is believed to be for real by the young generation, especially the Gen Z. We see that the Gen Z were born after 1996, and when the kids born in this generation started going to school, that’s when the social media erupted and expanded enormously, and started galloping our social world.

In the last 10 years, the world has changed a lot. Most of the apps and technologies we have become addicted to during the previous decade had been started only a few years back. Like Facebook in 2004, Youtube in 2005, Twitter in 2006, Tumblr in 2007, Whatsapp and Pinterest in 2009, Instagram in 2010 and Snapchat in 2011. We see every year there has been some new entry of social media app, except the 2008 year, ( due to the Great Recession effect, maybe). And soon these apps started dominating our social and personal space as well. The most latest entry is of TikTok in 2016, and which has gained considerable notoriety under the Trump Presidency, due to its sophisticated and super-addictive AI. The last decade was the breeding ground of new fan base for these apps, and now they all have become somewhat “Digital Frankensteins!”. This is because we are so much used to them, and our life is entwined with them on such a massive scale, that if the government decides to shut them down( which would never happen in near future at least), they cannot do it. Just like the big Wall Street banks which had failed in the 2007 recession due to sub-prime mortgage crisis, and the government had to bail them out under the label of “Too Big To Fail”( and the banks made sure that the bail out money went to pay their exiting CEO’s and board members some really hefty severance packages!). Similarly, we can see that these social media giants have become “Too Big To Fail” and their continued dominance will stay undisputed in the near future.

But unlike economy and banks, where our money and thereby livelihood is dependent on the savings we put in bank, or loans we take for our businesses, hence we are dependent on the banking institutions just like they rely on the customers. But in case of social media, atleast we have a remote chance that our lives can still be managed and survived without the social media. This is because there are still some old and credible sources of information and connectivity tools existing. For ex: Radio and Ham had been one of the most reliable info sources before TV and internet ushered in. People used to stay connected to each other besides use of telephone for connectivity.For news, we have the all weather print media, journals, magazines and books which often convey the most authentic and reliable information. We don’t need Facebook to stay in touch with friends. We can do that over the phone, or messaging service. After all, we all have hundreds of Facebook friends, but how many of us really connect with all of them? Do we even care of who is in our list, and do we make some serious effort to stay connected with all of them. The fact is we simply do not have time to spend to stay connected to all of them. We are used to a small group of like minded friends, and we tend to stay socially connected with them.

Same goes with instagram. Do we really care for the likes of our photos and videos we upload on the wall? After initial curiosity, it simply vanishes. Infact, human nature does not care for the repeated likes from our friends, but we slowly start looking at the comments and those friends who have not liked the pic!. Though there have been many positives brought by social media such as YouTube where one can share any video and become famous overnight. Justin Bieber is known to have gained his reputation via YT. Its a great medium for sharing knowledge and talks as well. Even Twitter was a new revolution for those who have amassed millions of followers, and any tweet would create sensation in the world. Trump has been using Twitter as a official tool for his Presidency, and many of his orders and declarations have been communicated to the world via Twitter. All this is terrific, and has changed the mainstream media world.

But slowly, we see that it has made us addictive, and lose sight of the relevant information. As I mentioned, earlier, there used to be only few ( and reliable) sources of info such as Radio, Television and Print media. Later, the new channels replaced the print media, and now we see the social media is replacing all of them. The most important concern on the social media is the complete lack of accountability of the content posted by anyone. Unlike radio or print, which is verified and edited, social media is rarely verified, and so the new world of fake news has emerged. Though the content can be reported, and the owners do take appropriate actions against them, but often it is too late and the content by then has reached millions of people all over the world. There is no way a tool can verify if the information is accurate and up to date. We do not have intelligent machines yet, and hence anything posted on the social media cannot be entirely trusted. Then comes the question, if the content is not verified, not trusted then why do we spend our precious time in scrolling through them?

Infact, there has been so much information ( tons and tons of bytes) created and uploaded everyday that it becomes nearly impossible for humans to decipher and absorb this information, let alone analyze and understand it. When there is too much information, its nothing but chaos!. But this continues because of the very basic fundamental of social media, which is everyone has the liberty to express their opinion or add content on grounds of personal freedom of expression. Yes, and this cannot be denied. I am writing this post due to this freedom and I agree that this is needed for the fresh influx of new ideas and opinions to be injested into the world. Hence, the real challenge is to know the difference between whats right and whats wrong. If we do not allow the social media to share all the content freely, then it will be a world of communsitic media, where everything is censored and restricted, just like it happens in China and erstwhile USSR. We do not want to live in that iron-curtain world again.

Finally, there is nothing wrong with the social media, and its usage in our daily lives as long they remain tools just like radio and TV, to share information, to connect with friends, to get the most recent information, or even to express our opinion about some injustice, or grievance. It is one of the most wonderful mediums we have today. But if that tool becomes complicated enough to intrude in our personal life by making us addicted with incessant notifications , updates, fake news and viral videos, then that’s a problem. If the social media like Facebook, as mentioned in the documentary is creating a digital footprint of our activity, and without our consent selling the data ( or selling us indirectly) to third party companies for advertisements or trying to change our opinion about political endorsements, then that’s a big problem. As its seen that all the social media tools have become powerful enough to predict our life, our decisions, our interests and our future as well. This is where the real problem lies. As long as we have the levers of control, we are okay. But if the levers lie in the hands of few social media giants, then we are in a big mess. This awareness is the true message this documentary has courageously conveyed. We all should appreciate the valor and genuine concern of all the people who left their secure and well-paying jobs in Google, Facebook, Twitter etc to come out and speak about this to the world. It is because of these few brave men and women, that the world is still a humane place to live.