Movie review: Yeh Ballet

The story of talent getting noticed and hope for a better life..

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Yeh Ballet | Roy Kapur Films

Over this long weekend, I found some time to watch this amazing movie: Yeh Ballet. Another thing I did is that I completed reading one book ( What young India wants), and I plan to write its review in the next post.

The movie is superb and heart-touching in almost every aspect of film making. The story, the actors and their background in Mumbai, their struggles and finally, making their dream come true has been filmed wonderfully. Kudos to Soni Taraporewala for making such an amazing movie.

The topic of this movie is infact very unique because even though ballet is world famous in many parts of the world, but somehow, it never entered India. Maybe India already had a lot of its own ethnic and cultural dance forms, that there was simply no space for Ballet to occupy. This movie however is based on a true story. An Israeli-American ( Saul Aaron, based on real life ballet teacher Yehuda Maor) is invited to Mumbai by a dance academy to teach ballet to its students. The dance academy has quite a number of rich kids from affluent parts of Mumbai, but somehow, two guys ( Amiruddin Shah and Manish Chauhan) both of them being from slum areas of Mumbai, are miraculously allowed to enter this academy. And by their talent and a bit of luck, the teacher, Saul spots both of them and finds that amongst all the students, only these two guys have the perfect talent and physique to become a ballet dancer. Both of them are exceptionally talented in other dance forms as well, including b-boying, hip-hop and whacking. But the only thing they lacked is money and parents support. Manish had to leave his house as his father disapproved of him and he chose his dreams of becoming a world famous ballet dancer over other comforts. The movie shows how much hardships he had to endure to make his dream come true.

Amiruddin or simply as Amir, also came from slum area and suffered from bias, street fighting and lack of family support for his dancing skills. Later, Saul took care of both of them and allowed them to stay with him in his house. They both learnt a lot from Saul and he stayed with them in their times of need. Infact when they both got selected to attend the ballet course in America, but couldnt make it to the US visa due to their lack of financial assets, Saul deposited his own money in both of their accounts to make sure his poor yet talented students get to attend the ballet course. I wonder who does this in real world which is filled with cynicism and jealousy. This scene touched my heart!

Finally, they did make it to the ballet school in America and the movie ends with an happy ending. But it does teach a lot of lessons and insights. After watching this movie, I got to know how much talent the poor kids living in slum areas of Mumbai and even other parts of India have! This often goes unnoticed most of the times. Amir and Manish were lucky to get discovered by Saul and finally they could make their dream come true.

The film portrays the typical expectation of Indian parents to ignore their kids talents in all fields, except academics. Both Amir and Manish family disapproves their sons dancing talent. Only later do they realize how fortunate they are for God and Allah to bestow them with a son having such an incredible talent which is found in one in millions. I wonder how many Amir and Manish are there in India, who would be having some gifted talent in arts, dance, music, writing or painting, but often gets neglected just because the Indian Dream only allows Engineers and Doctors to be respected and paid well. The rest professions according to the middle class parents are ticket to poverty and joblessness.

Finally, the most touching character is that of the ballet teacher, Saul Aaron. Where can we find such benevolent and selfless teachers in this world today? On one side the academia and teaching profession is tainted with obsession for money and promoting nepotism by supporting only those kids whose parents are rich and elite, while on the other side, the world still has teachers like Saul who are kind and professional enough to support their students, purely on talent, and irrespective of their background. The film does have a scene where one of the rich students parents, whose daughter could not make it to the ballet course due to lack of her talent, tries to question the academy owner if those slum kids got an admission based on reservation! This is hillarious as the academy owner had to clarify that there is no concept of reservation in ballet schools in America. Even in 2021, the fact that Indian society is obsessed with medieval concepts of caste and reservations, and often sidelines talent is deeply troubling. But inspite of all this, both of them could successfully make it to the ballet school. Indeed, fortune favors the brave and the talented…

I end this movie review here and would like to tell my dear readers to watch this movie on Netflix. Its simply worth watching!

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Hope is a good thing!

How to be aware of the power within us!

The heading of this post might remind few of the readers about the epic movie “The Shawshank Redemption”. That movie is one of my favorites! In that movie, Andy Dufresne tells Red, that “Hope is a good thing, and no good thing ever dies!”. I find this quote to be so much valuable in our life.

Because everything changes in life. Just like day and night, young and old, summer and winter, so does our situations, our successes, our failures all change with time. Similarly in life, we see events happening, and some events are so deep, that their effect remain with us for a long time. We feel that this will never change. We start losing hope, and then suddenly, out of utter darkness, there comes a ray of light which makes darkness disappear. That ray of light is the hope. A small good event can change the entire situation. We ought to keep faith in that ray of hope.

I particularly like the Austrian psychologist Viktor Frankl’s book “Man’s Search for Meaning”. It is one of the splendid books ever written. For me, that book is something which charges my battery with renewed hope and faith, whenever failures or setbacks bombard me. That book is like a charging station of positivity and synergy. The book is very simple yet heart touching. The author had to undergo the worst experiences in Auschwitz, yet he managed to not only survive but also find hope and faith in such a hell. He even helped several of his colleagues to overcome depression and losing hope in life. The author simply argued that “Life can have meaning even in the most miserable of circumstances and that the motivation for living comes from finding that meaning. That we humans have a power to choose our response to situations, however gruesome they might be, And in our response lies our growth and our freedom.”

I find this to be so true even in our daily life. Thank God we are in much better situation as compared to the infernal concentration camps. And we have the same power to respond to the situations we face in our life. Stephen Covey quoted ” Look at the word responsibility—“response-ability”—the ability to choose your response. Highly proactive people recognize that responsibility. They do not blame circumstances, conditions, or conditioning for their behavior. Their behavior is a product of their own conscious choice, based on values, rather than a product of their conditions, based on feeling”. Isn’t the message by Viktor Frankl and Stephen Covey resonate on the same note?

The Peter Parker principle says “With more power, comes more responsibility”. I would add on to that, No power does not mean no responsibility. Because, whether the situation is good or bad, we all are “Response-Able”. Our response does not depend on the power. Rather, I find with positive or pro-active response to any situation, comes more power to beat the problem!

We all have the power and freedom to choose the response. We can either give positive or negative response. Everyone has the ability to respond. And this power to respond is a hope for us, that every situation can be changed. If some of us remember the movie Cast Away, we can relate how Tom Hanks desperately tried hard to get away from the island to reach civilization, but the stormy ocean waves destroyed all of his attempts. Until one day, he finds the same storm delivers a metal enclosure, and suddenly Tom receives a brainwave! He finds hope that he can escape using that part, and finally he builds a much stronger boat that can withstand the waves, and sails across the mighty ocean to get noticed by civilization! That’s hope and faith, my friend!

So, never lose hope, never lose your response, however dark the night may be!